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Cultural Studies Books

You are currently browsing 41–50 of 2,463 new and published books in the subject of Cultural Studies — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 5

  1. Heritage, Nationhood, and Language

    Migrants with Connections to Japan

    Edited by Neriko Doerr

    The notion of "heritage" has become one of the global tropes in recent years. At the heart of heritage politics are three questions: what heritage is, who decides what it is, and for whom is the decision made. However, existing work on heritage language has rarely tackled these questions, assuming...

    Published April 10th 2015 by Routledge

  2. Genre and the City

    Edited by Michael Shapiro

    This book’s chapters analyze aspects of urban politics with a combination of critical thinking (influenced by Walter Benjamin, Jacques Ranciere, Henri Lefebvre, and Achille Mbembe, among others) and readings of artistic genres (film, literature, and architecture). The coverage of cities includes,...

    Published April 10th 2015 by Routledge

  3. Digital Media, Cultural Production and Speculative Capitalism

    Edited by Freya Schiwy, Alessandro Fornazzari

    This collection of essays explores the interfaces between new information technologies and their impact on contemporary culture, and recent transformations in capitalist production. From a transnational frame, the essays investigate some of the key facets of contemporary global capitalism: the...

    Published April 10th 2015 by Routledge

  4. Amateurism in British Sport

    It Matters Not Who Won or Lost?

    Edited by Dilwyn Porter, Stephen Wagg

    The ideal of the amateur competitor, playing the game for love and, unlike the professional, totally untainted by commerce, has become embedded in many accounts of the development of modern sport. It has proved influential not least because it has underpinned a pervasive impression of...

    Published April 10th 2015 by Routledge

  5. Gender, Age, and Digital Games in the Domestic Context

    By Alison Harvey

    Series: Routledge Advances in Game Studies

    Western digital game play has shifted in important ways over the last decade, with a plethora of personal devices affording a range of increasingly diverse play experiences. Despite the celebration of a more inclusive environment of digital game play, very little grounded research has been devoted...

    Published April 8th 2015 by Routledge

  6. Transforming Addiction

    Gender, Trauma, Transdisciplinarity

    Edited by Lorraine Greaves, Nancy Poole, Ellexis Boyle

    Addiction is a complex problem that requires more nuanced responses. Transforming Addiction advances addictions research and treatment by promoting transdisciplinary collaboration, the integration of sex and gender, and issues of trauma and mental health. The authors demonstrate these shifts and...

    Published April 8th 2015 by Routledge

  7. Media History and the Archive

    Edited by Craig Robertson

    By the time readers encounter academic history in the form of books and articles, all that tends to be left of an author’s direct experience with archives is pages of endnotes. Whether intentionally or not, archives have until recently been largely thought of as discrete collections of documents,...

    Published April 7th 2015 by Routledge

  8. Intellectuals and Cultural Policy

    Edited by JEREMY AHEARNE, OLIVER BENNETT

    Intellectuals and policy analysts might appear to inhabit two different worlds. Intellectuals aspire to articulate issues of universal concern; policy analysts attend to the detail of specific measures and programmes. How far do these common assumptions match up to reality? What happens when...

    Published April 7th 2015 by Routledge

  9. Women and the Victorian Occult

    Edited by Tatiana Kontou

    Increasingly, contemporary scholarship reveals the strong connection between Victorian women and the world of the nineteenth-century supernatural. Women were intrinsically bound to the occult and the esoteric from mediums who materialised spirits to the epiphanic experiences of the New Woman, from...

    Published April 7th 2015 by Routledge

  10. Affirmative Action and Racial Equity

    Considering the Fisher Case to Forge the Path Ahead

    By Uma M. Jayakumar, Liliana M. Garces

    The highly anticipated U.S. Supreme Court decision in Fisher v. University of Texas placed a greater onus on higher education institutions to provide evidence supporting the need for affirmative action policies on their respective campuses. It is now more critical than ever that institutional...

    Published April 2nd 2015 by Routledge