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Interdisciplinary Literary Studies Books

You are currently browsing 1–10 of 753 new and published books in the subject of Interdisciplinary Literary Studies — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books

  1. Theoretical Schools and Circles in the Twentieth-Century Humanities

    Literary Theory, History, Philosophy

    Edited by Marina Grishakova, Silvi Salupere

    Series: Routledge Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Literature

    Schools and circles have been a major force in twentieth-century intellectual movements. They fostered circulation of ideas within and between disciplines, thus altering the shape of intellectual inquiry. This volume offers a new perspective on theoretical schools in the humanities, both as...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  2. Darwin in Atlantic Cultures

    Evolutionary Visions of Race, Gender, and Sexuality

    Edited by Jeannette Eileen Jones, Patrick B. Sharp

    This collection is an interdisciplinary edited volume that examines the circulation of Darwinian ideas in the Atlantic space as they impacted systems of Western thought and culture. Specifically, the book explores the influence of the principle tenets of Darwinism -- such as the theory of evolution...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  3. The Historical Imagination of G.K. Chesterton

    Locality, Patriotism, and Nationalism

    By Joseph McCleary

    Series: Studies in Major Literary Authors

    This study examines a selection of Chesterton’s novels, poetry, and literary criticism and outlines the distinctive philosophy of history that emerges from these writings. Looking at Chesteron's relationship with and influence upon authors including William Cobbett, Sir Walter Scott, Belloc, Shaw,...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  4. The Uses of the Future in Early Modern Europe

    Edited by Andrea Brady, Emily Butterworth

    Series: Routledge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture

    Is modernity synonymous with progress? Did the Renaissance really break with the cyclical, agrarian time of the Middle Ages, inaugurating a new concept of irreversible time in a secular culture defined by development? How does methodology affect scholarly responses to the idea of the future in the...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  5. William Morris and the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings

    By Andrea Elizabeth Donovan

    Series: Literary Criticism and Cultural Theory

    The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, founded by artist and craftsman William Morris in 1877, sought to preserve the integrity of historic buildings by preventing unnecessary repairs and additions. William Morris's intention and that of the SPAB, as outlined by the original manifesto...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  6. Heroism and the Supernatural in the African Epic

    By Mariam Konaté Deme

    There exists a strong tendency within Western literary criticism to either deny the existence of epics in Africa or to see African literatures as exotic copies of European originals. In both cases, Western criticism has largely failed to acknowledge the distinctiveness of African...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  7. Victorian Servants, Class, and the Politics of Literacy

    By Jean Fernandez

    Series: Routledge Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature

    In this volume, Fernandez brings the under-examined figure of the Victorian servant out of obscurity in order to tell the story of his or her encounter with literacy, as imagined and represented in nineteenth-century fiction, autobiography, pamphlets and diaries. A vast body of writing is uncovered...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  8. Politics and Aesthetics in Contemporary Native American Literature

    Across Every Border

    By Matthew Herman

    Over the last twenty years, Native American literary studies has taken a sharp political turn. In this book, Matthew Herman provides the historical framework for this shift and examines the key moments in the movement away from cultural analyses toward more politically inflected and motivated...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  9. Travel and Modernist Literature

    Sacred and Ethical Journeys

    By Alexandra Peat

    Series: Routledge Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature

    Through close readings of works from Henry James to W. E. B. Du Bois, and from Virginia Woolf to Jean Rhys, this book discusses how fictional travelers negotiate and adapt various tropes of travel (such as quest, expatriation, displacement, and exile) as models for their own journeys. Specifically,...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  10. Travel Writing and Atrocities

    Eyewitness Accounts of Colonialism in the Congo, Angola, and the Putumayo

    By Robert Burroughs

    Series: Routledge Research in Travel Writing

    This book examines eyewitness travel reports of atrocities committed in European-funded slave regimes in the Congo Free State, Portuguese West Africa, and the Putumayo district of the Amazon rainforest during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. During this time, British explorers,...

    Published April 23rd 2015 by Routledge