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Literary Genres Books

You are currently browsing 81–90 of 852 new and published books in the subject of Literary Genres — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 9

  1. Fantasy and Mimesis (Routledge Revivals)

    Responses to Reality in Western Literature

    By Kathryn Hume

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    Since Plato and Aristotle’s declaration of the essence of literature as imitation, western narrative has been traditionally discussed in mimetic terms. Marginalized fantasy- the deliberate from reality – has become the hidden face of fiction, identified by most critics as a minor genre. First...

    Published June 23rd 2014 by Routledge

  2. Terrors of Uncertainty (Routledge Revivals)

    The Cultural Contexts of Horror Fiction

    By Joseph Grixti

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    From Frankenstein and Dracula to Psycho and The Chainsaw Massacre, horror fiction has provided our culture with some of its most enduring themes and narratives. Considering horror fiction both as a genre and as a social phenomenon, Joseph Grixti provides a theoretical and historical framework for...

    Published June 23rd 2014 by Routledge

  3. Milton (Routledge Revivals)

    A Study in Ideology and Form

    By Christopher Kendrick

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    First published in 1986, this title critiques the canonical view of Milton as an isolated Great Man, and reassesses the impact of the Puritan Revolution on two of his major works: the Areopagitica and Paradise Lost. The study focuses on the emergence of a discreet ethical framework of thought...

    Published June 23rd 2014 by Routledge

  4. Classical Genres and English Poetry (Routledge Revivals)

    By William H. Race

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    First published in 1988, this study explains how certain genres created by Classical poets were adapted and sometimes transformed by the poets of the modern world, beginning with the Tudor poets’ rediscovery of the Classical heritage. Most of the long-lived poetic genres are discussed, from...

    Published June 13th 2014 by Routledge

  5. Elizabethan Grotesque (Routledge Revivals)

    By Neil Rhodes

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    The comic grotesque is a powerful element in a great deal of Elizabethan literature, but one which has attracted scant critical attention. In this study, first published in 1980, Neil Rhodes examines the nature of the grotesque in late sixteenth-century culture, and shows the part it played in the...

    Published June 13th 2014 by Routledge

  6. Wordsworth's Historical Imagination (Routledge Revivals)

    The Poetry of Displacement

    By David Simpson

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    Traditionally, Wordsworth’s greatness is founded on his identity as the poet of nature and solitude. The Wordsworthian imagination is seen as an essentially private faculty, its very existence premised on the absence of other people. In this title, first published in 1987, David Simpson challenges...

    Published June 13th 2014 by Routledge

  7. V. S. Naipaul (Routledge Revivals)

    By Peter Hughes

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    First published in 1988, Peter Hughes explores the work of V. S. Naipaul, and the interplay of fictional and non-fictional patters in what is his obsessive vision of human life. Hughes shows how Naipaul’s narratives pair off histories and novels, travel-writing and psycho-biography, reinforcing one...

    Published June 13th 2014 by Routledge

  8. The Faerie Queene (Routledge Revivals)

    By Humphrey Tonkin

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene is among the most important literary products of the Elizabethan age, and the vast sweep of its moral, political and social concerns tells us more about the age than any other work. This volume, first published in 1989, offers detailed readings of each of the poem...

    Published June 13th 2014 by Routledge

  9. T.S. Eliot's Civilized Savage

    Religious Eroticism and Poetics

    By Laurie MacDiarmid

    Series: Studies in Major Literary Authors

    T. S. Eliot's Civilized Savage revisits this poet's drafts and canonical poetry in a sometimes dismissive critical arena . While contemporary readers emphasize Eliot's charged personal life, his anti-Semitism, his political conservatism, and his misogyny, Laurie MacDiarmid argues that although...

    Published June 9th 2014 by Routledge

  10. The Machine that Sings

    Modernism, Hart Crane and the Culture of the Body

    By Gordon A. Tapper

    Series: Studies in Major Literary Authors

    Examining how Crane's corporeal aesthetic informs poems written across the span of his career, The Machine That Sings focuses on four texts in which Crane's preoccupation with the body reaches its apoge. Tapper treats Voyages, The Wine Merchant, and Possessions as a triptych of erotic poems in...

    Published May 30th 2014 by Routledge