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Socio-Legal Studies Books

You are currently browsing 31–40 of 369 new and published books in the subject of Socio-Legal Studies — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 4

  1. Urban Commons

    Rethinking the City

    Edited by Christian Borch, Martin Kornberger

    Series: Space, Materiality and the Normative

    This book rethinks the city by examining its various forms of collectivity – their atmospheres, modes of exclusion and self-organization, as well as how they are governed – on the basis of a critical discussion of the notion of urban commons. The idea of the commons has received surprisingly little...

    Published March 23rd 2015 by Routledge

  2. Routledge Handbook of Law and Religion

    Edited by Silvio Ferrari

    The field of law and religion studies has undergone a profound transformation over the last thirty years, looking beyond traditional relationships between State and religious communities to include rights of religious liberty and the role of religion in the public space. This handbook features new,...

    Published March 16th 2015 by Routledge

  3. Law, Environmental Illness and Medical Uncertainty

    The Contested Governance of Health

    By Tarryn Phillips

    Series: Social Justice

    We’ve seen it before, with asbestos-related disease, leukaemia clusters and lung cancer caused by cigarettes. There tends to be a lag between the emergence of environmental risks and chemical injuries, and their recognition and therapeutic treatment by medicine and the law. Law, Environmental...

    Published March 12th 2015 by Routledge

  4. Puerto Rico and the Origins of U.S. Global Empire

    The Disembodied Shade

    By Charles R. Venator-Santiago

    Series: Law and the Postcolonial

    Drawing on a postcolonial legal history of the United States’ territorial expansionism, this book provides an analysis of the foundations of its global empire. Charles R. Venator-Santiago argues that the United States has developed three traditions of territorial expansionism with corresponding...

    Published March 11th 2015 by Routledge

  5. Private Justice

    Towards Intergrated Theorising in the Sociology of Law

    By Stuart Henry

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    This book, first published in 1983, looks at discipline in industry and shows how private justice is integrally bound up with formal law. It is a timely examination of the forms of social control that exist ostensibly outside the formal legal system but on which it crucially depends. Private...

    Published March 9th 2015 by Routledge

  6. Social Rights and Human Welfare

    By Hartley Dean

    An essential introduction to rights-based approaches in social policy, this text critically explores how social rights underpin human wellbeing. It discusses social rights as rights of citizenship in developed welfare states and as an essential component within the international human rights and...

    Published March 5th 2015 by Routledge

  7. Care, Migration and Human Rights

    Law and Practice

    Edited by Siobhán Mullally

    Series: Routledge Research in Human Rights Law

    The continuum of exploitation that has historically defined the everyday of domestic work - exclusion from employment and social security standards and precarious migration status – has frequently been neglected. It is primarily the moments of crisis, incidents of human trafficking, slavery or...

    Published January 29th 2015 by Routledge

  8. Chronotopes of Law

    Jurisdiction, Scale and Governance

    By Mariana Valverde

    Series: Social Justice

    This book develops a new framework for analyzing the spatio-temporal workings of law and other forms of governance. Chronotopes of Law: Jurisdiction, Scale and Governance argues that studies of law and governance can be reinvigorated by drawing on a bundle of quite heterogenous analytical...

    Published January 15th 2015 by Routledge

  9. The Pirate Myth

    Genealogies of an Imperial Concept

    By Amedeo Policante

    Series: Law and the Postcolonial

    The image of the pirate is at once spectral and ubiquitous. It haunts the imagination of international legal scholars, diplomats and statesmen involved in the war on terror. It returns in the headlines of international newspapers as an untimely ‘security threat’. It materializes on the most...

    Published January 13th 2015 by Routledge

  10. The Concept of the Civilian

    Legal Recognition, Adjudication and the Trials of International Criminal Justice

    By Claire Garbett

    Series: Transitional Justice

    The Concept of the Civilian: Legal Recognition, Adjudication and the Trials of International Criminal Justice offers a critical account of the legal shaping of civilian identities by the processes of international criminal justice. It draws on a detailed case-study of the International Criminal...

    Published January 12th 2015 by Routledge