Curriculum Development in the Postmodern Era

Teaching and Learning in an Age of Accountability, 3rd Edition

By Patrick Slattery

Routledge – 2013 – 348 pages

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Description

This landmark text was one of the first to introduce and analyze contemporary concepts of curriculum that emerged from the Reconceptualization of curriculum studies in the 1970s and 1980s. This new edition brings readers up to date on the major research themes (postmodernism,ecological, hermeneutics, aesthetics and arts-based research, race, class, gender, sexuality, and classroom practices) within the historical development of the field from the 1950s to the present. Like the previous editions, it is unique in providing a comprehensive overview in a relatively short and highly accessible text. Provocative and powerful narratives (both biography and autoethnography) throughout invite readers to engage the complex theories in a personal conversation. School-based examples allow readers to make connections to schools and society, teacher education, and professional development of teachers.

Changes in the Third Edition

  • New Glossary - brief summaries in the text direct readers to the Companion Website to read the entire entries
  • New analysis of the current accountability movement in schools including the charter school movement.
  • More international references clearly connected to international contexts
  • More narratives invite readers to engage the complex theories in a personal conversation
  • Companion Website–new for this edition

Reviews

'This book is well organized and well-written; the original thought, academic base and depth of scholarship are above par. This definitive book is highly recommended for educators and educational leaders, curriculum development specialist, researchers and policy advocators of higher learning, doctoral students in all disciplines, trainers and those particularly interested in improving the dynamics of learning.' - Citizenship, Social and Economics Education

Contents

Contents

Preface to the Third Edition

Introduction

Part I Curriculum Development as a Field of Study

1. Introduction to Curriculum Development, Reconceptualization, and Postmodernity

2. Historical Perspectives on Curriculum as a Field of Study

3. The Reconceptualization of Curriculum Studies

4. Postmodern Schooling, Curriculum, and the Theological Text

Part II Complicated Conversations in Contemporary Curriculum Development

5. The Hermeneutic Circle and the Interpretative Process

6. Gender, Sexuality, Race, and Ethnicity in a Multicultural and Diverse Milieu

7. Postmodern Philosophies in Curriculum Studies

8. Curriculum for Interdependence and Ecological Sustainability

9. Utopian Visions, Democracy, and the Egalitarian Ideal

10. Aesthetic Inquiry, Arts-Based Research, and the Proleptic Moment

Part III Curriculum Development in the Postmodern Era

11. Time and Complexity

12. A Vision of Curriculum in the Postmodern Era

Glossary

References

Subject Index

Name Index

Author Bio

Patrick Slattery is Regents Scholar and Professor of Curriculum Development and Philosophy of Education at Texas A&M University. He holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Teaching, Learning & Culture and Educational Administration & Human Resource Development.

Welcome!

Welcome to the Companion Website for Curriculum Development in the Postmodern Era: Teaching and Learning in an Age of Accountability, Third Edition. This landmark text was one of the first to introduce and analyze contemporary concepts of curriculum that emerged from the reconceptualization of curriculum studies in the 1970s and 1980s. The field continues to evolve in dynamic and important ways. This new edition brings readers up to date on the major research themes (postmodernism, ecological, hermeneutics, aesthetics, and arts-based research, race, class, gender, sexuality, and classroom practices) within the historical development of the field from the 1950s to the present.