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15th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference (IARC)

The International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference is based on a tradition of excellence, and brings together researchers and clinical specialists in Speech-Language Pathology, Linguistics, Neuropsychology, and Rehabilitation Medicine dedicated to aphasia rehabilitation.

The conference is an international forum that gives both researchers and clinical practitioners an excellent opportunity to meet colleagues from other countries and discuss their recent work in aphasiology.

Find more details about this conference here.

Psychology Press will have a booth at this meeting where you will find a selection of our new and bestselling books, and where you can browse our relevant journals.

Rydges Melbourne Hotel, 186 Exhibition Street, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia

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Featured Books at this Event

  1. Handbook of Vowels and Vowel Disorders

    Edited by Martin J. Ball, Fiona E. Gibbon

    Series: Language and Speech Disorders

    In the general study of speech and phonetics, vowels have stood in second place to consonants. But what vowels are, how they differ from one another, how they vary among speakers, and how they are subject to disorder, are questions that require a closer examination. This Handbook presents a...

    Published September 4th 2012 by Psychology Press

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Rehabilitation for Everyday Adaptive Living, 2nd Edition

    By Jennie Ponsford, Sue Sloan, Pamela Snow

    Research into the rehabilitation of individuals following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the past 15 years has resulted in greater understanding of the condition. The second edition of this book provides an updated guide for health professionals working with individuals recovering from TBI. Its...

    Published July 11th 2012 by Psychology Press

  3. BCoS Cognitive Screen

    By Glyn W. Humphreys, Wai-Ling Bickerton, Dana Samson, M. Jane Riddoch

    Following different kinds of brain damage, including stroke, head injury, carbon monoxide poisoning, and degenerative change, people can experience a range of cognitive problems, in addition to any difficulties in motor function. These problems strongly influence a patient’s ability to recover, but...

    Published May 8th 2012 by Psychology Press

  4. Perspectives on Agrammatism

    Edited by Roelien Bastiaanse, Cynthia K. Thompson

    Series: Brain, Behaviour and Cognition

    Agrammatic aphasia (agrammatism), resulting from brain damage to regions of the brain involved in language processing, affects grammatical aspects of language. Therefore, research examining language breakdown (and recovery) patterns in agrammatism is of great interest and importance to linguists,...

    Published April 5th 2012 by Psychology Press

  5. A Compendium of Tests, Scales and Questionnaires

    The Practitioner's Guide to Measuring Outcomes after Acquired Brain Impairment

    By Robyn L. Tate

    This Compendium is a comprehensive reference manual containing an extensive selection of instruments developed to measure signs and symptoms commonly encountered in neurological conditions, both progressive and non-progressive. It provides a repository of established instruments, as well as...

    Published April 7th 2010 by Psychology Press

  6. Cluttering

    A Handbook of Research, Intervention and Education

    Edited by David Ward, Kathleen Scaler Scott

    Very few people are aware of the significant negative impact that cluttering -- a communication disorder that affects a person's ability to speak in a clear, concise and fluent manner -- can have on one's life educationally, socially and vocationally. Although different from...

    Published February 17th 2011 by Psychology Press

  7. Recovery from Stuttering

    By Peter Howell

    Series: Language and Speech Disorders

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the evidence, theories, and practical issues associated with recovery from stuttering in early childhood and into adolescence. It examines evidence that stuttering is associated with a range of biological factors — such as genetics — and psychological factors —...

    Published November 8th 2010 by Psychology Press