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Major Works

Major Works: Natural History

You are currently browsing 11–17 of 17 new and published major works in the subject of Natural History — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For major works that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming major works.

Routledge Major Works has a strong international focus and each of the sets is edited by a leading expert in their field. This publishing programme continues to grow with new book series being created all the time.

Titles published by Routledge Major Works cover an abundance of literature on leading and influential figures, key concepts, topics and sub-disciplines across the social sciences, humanities, behavioural sciences and law.

New and Published Books – Page 2

  1. Man's Place in Nature, 1863

    By Thomas Henry Huxley

    Huxley was one of the first adherents to Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection and advanced its acceptance by scientists and the public. Man's Place in Nature was explicitly directed against Richard Owen, who had claimed that there were distinct differences between human brains and...

    Published November 26th 2003 by Routledge

  2. Geological Evidence of the Antiquity of Man, 1863

    By Charles Lyell

    Charles Lyell's argument in this classic volume is that the processes of nature are slow and uniform, and that the Earth is in consequence hundreds of millions of years old. This work includes his prediction that if our nearest relatives are great apes, then the places to look for human fossils...

    Published November 26th 2003 by Routledge

  3. The Evolution Debate, 1813-1870

    Edited by David Knight

    The history of evolutionary thought is often seen as a triumph of secularism in the form of 'scientific naturalism', over religious bigotry. But for those involved in the debate during the nineteenth century, these divisions were not so clearly marked.This collection of nine volumes will bring...

    Published November 26th 2003 by Routledge

  4. Essay on the Theory of the Earth, 1813

    By Georges Cuvier

    Based at the Parisian Museum of Natural History, Cuvier was able to compare the fossil bones he dug from the quarries of Montmartre with those of animals alive today. Guided by the principle of correlation, that all the parts of an animal must cohere, and by analogy, with living species, Cuvier...

    Published November 26th 2003 by Routledge

  5. Omphalos, 1857

    By Philip Gosse

    Gosse argued that fossils are not really the remains of creatures which existed. God had created the world in six days, but had made it look like it was already ancient, complete with the remains of non-existent pre-historic life. Gosse's work was popular with neither Christians nor evolutionists....

    Published November 26th 2003 by Routledge

  6. On the Origin of Species, 1859

    By Charles Darwin

    On the Origin of Species caused an uproar when it was first published in 1859. Darwin's theory was that species had evolved from simpler organisms by natural selection acting upon the variability of populations. This view was directly opposed to the doctrine of special creation by God and angered...

    Published November 26th 2003 by Routledge

  7. Geology & Mineralogy, Considered with Reference to Natural Theology, Volume II, 1836

    By William Buckland

    Moving away from his earlier belief in a short, catastrophic history of the Earth, this volume shows how Buckland envisages instead progressive change as the Earth gradually cooled as it was prepared for human occupation. Extinct creatures did not die out because they were poorly designed; God...

    Published November 26th 2003 by Routledge

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