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Welcome to the Psychology Press Research Methods and Statistics Blog, where we publish news and updates about featured products, notable authors, special promotions and discounts. You can also browse our blog posts by category to learn more about products in your area of interest.

Recent Articles

  1. Rediscover tandfebooks.com - have you heard what’s new?

    With over 50,000 eBooks across the humanities, social sciences and education, Taylor & Francis eBooks provides direct access to a wealth of quality academic content for research and study.

    New for 2015! All titles purchased by your institution from March 1st 2015 will be DRM-free, meaning that you can access, print, and copy and paste without any restrictions at all. In addition, new powerful filtered search enables you to effortlessly reach the most relevant content. Rediscover how tandfebooks can help you!

  2. New Year, New You

    Routledge is pleased to offer you a collection of resources designed to help you and your clients make and stick to positive changes in the new year. Download the free eBook, New Year, New You: Tips and Strategies for Self-Improvement!

  3. New! Psychology and Mental Health Research and Reference Catalog

    Visit the new Psychology and Mental Health Research and Reference catalog, featuring new and recent titles from across the behavioral sciences, published under both the Routledge and Psychology Press imprints. Including handbooks, monographs, special issues as books, and multi-volume sets including Library Editions and Major Works, this catalog contains a variety of titles ideal for building your psychology library collection.

  4. New Year, New You

    Download New Year, New You

    Routledge Mental Health wants to help you start off 2015 on the right foot. Download a free copy of New Year, New You and make this one your best year yet.

  5. 15 Ways To Stick To Your New Year’s Resolutions

    A New Year means a New You!

  6. Handbook of Intraindividual Variability Across the Life Span

    Just Published    Intraindividual variability (IIV) of human development and behavior across the entire life-span is explored in this new book. Leading researchers summarize recent findings on the extent, role, and function of IIV in human development with a focus on how, when, and why individuals change over time. The latest theoretical, methodological, and technological advances are reviewed. The book explores the historical and theoretical background and challenges of IIV research along with its role and function in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. 

  7. Handbook of Item Response Theory Modeling

    NEW      Item response theory (IRT) has moved beyond the confines of educational measurement into assessment domains such as personality, psychopathology, and patient-reported outcomes. Classic and emerging IRT methods and applications that are revolutionizing psychological measurement, particularly for health assessments used to demonstrate treatment effectiveness, are reviewed in this new volume.

  8. Do you use Facebook or Twitter?

    Tell us what you want to see from our social media feeds and to thank you for helping us improve, you'll be entered to win $150/£100 worth of books.

  9. DR TAN

    #ASKDRTAN: Psychology Professor Answers the Questions You Submitted Via Social Media

    #ASKDRTAN week drew questions from students, professors, researchers. Siu-Lan Tan, Ph.D., first author of leading text Psychology of Music: From Sound to Significance, answers all your questions.

  10. More Statistical and Methodological Myths and Urban Legends

    Just Published    This book provides an up-to-date review of commonly undertaken methodological and statistical practices that are based partially in sound scientific rationale and partially in unfounded lore. Some examples of these “methodological urban legends” are characterized by manuscript critiques such as: (a) “your self-report measures suffer from common method bias”; (b) “your item-to-subject ratios are too low”; (c) “you can’t generalize these findings to the real world”; or (d) “your effect sizes are too low.”
     

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